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We just recently discussed Rod Stewart’s work with the Faces, and his career trajectory, here on the Drunkard; you can read about that here (it is actually recommended before preceding to the rest of this post). If you are still reading, than you must be into the Faces, and if this is the case, than you are most definitely a fan of the first four Rod Stewart albums, or at least, you should be.
These albums were in part cut with members of the Faces, and have the same organic feel to them as the group’s material. What Stewart excels in, on these early seventies LPs, is the marriage of acoustic instrumentation with the energy of the Faces rock & roll swagger. Also of note, on these early LPs, is Stewart’s remarkable interpretation of cover material (Dylan, Sam Cooke, etc.).

Related: The Faces :: Five Guys Walk Into A Bar

Download:
MP3:
Rod Stewart :: Every Picture Tells A Story
MP3: Rod Stewart :: Handbags And Gladrags
MP3: Rod Stewart :: Gasoline Alley
MP3: Rod Stewart :: I’d Rather Go Blind
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Amazon: Rod Stewart – Early Catalog

+ Download your msuic DRM free via eMusic’s 25 Free MP3 trial offer.
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+ Check out additional Rod Stewart tracks at the Hype Machine.

10 Responses to “Rod Stewart :: Early Years (The First 4 Albums)”

  1. Great picks. I love these albums, and the Faces stuff too. Keep up the great work.

  2. ‘Every Picture Tells a Story’ is, IMO, one of the more underrated Rock albums of the 70’s, if not of all time. That joint has classic tunes from front to back and never lets up.

    Hopefully, with posts like yours here, Rod’s early material gets more exposure to the masses….these albums deserve it.

  3. Gotta agree with White Silk. All great songs in “Every Picture Tells a Story”. The title song has some of my favorite lyrics especially:

    “I couldn’t quote you no Dickens, Shelley or Keats
    ’cause it’s all been said before”

    I mean you don’t expect to see that in a kick ass rock song. Just sublime.

    Missed your first post on the Faces.

    I would have gone with this vid:

    http://www.youtube.com/w/The-Faces–Stay-With-Me-%28Live%29?v=hG6JLDWUw3E&search=rod%20stewart

    Bonus point for the groovy 60’s fashion/dancing going on in the audience.

  4. While not the original lineup, I did get to see the Faces on their last tour in 1975. Kind of funny seeing Ronnie Wood with the Faces after a few months earlier seeing him with the Stones. They still had lots of kick ass energy and fun sloppiness that has disappeared in Rod’s later bands. Actually had peter Frampton opening a few months before the live album was released.

    I’ve also always considered Every Picture… to be one of the all time great rock records of the seventies….

  5. I’ve just found your site (through a link from MOKB) and have been digging around for the last hour or so.. I pretty much love everything that’s here!

    My girlhood obsession with Rod Stewart was ignited when I saw him in some sort of video for “Twistin’ the Night Away,” (posted at youtube: here), and I guess I should have really felt some sympathy for good ol’ Sam Cooke, but I think really I was only eight years old and Rod Stewart was a cute dude with spiky hair, so I was quickly won over. Handbags and Gladrags, though, is far and away one of my favorite RS classics. Thanks for the post!

  6. Every Picture Tells a Story – the link is dead for me. Thanks for the posts on The Faces and early Rod Stewart. Great music.

  7. Good roundup. Rod Stewart was pretty hot during this period – it’s kind of sad how pop he became after all the great stuff.

  8. I’d love to have a copy of “I’d Rather Go Blind”, but the mp3 isn’t working. Is there some other way for me to get a copy.

    I’ve always adored Rod Stewart!

  9. great post!!

  10. Rod’s one of the most underestimated Rock singers…jut love him…but mostly when he was in the Faces!

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