Archive for the 'Drive-By Truckers' Category

Thursday, April 3rd, 2014

There are certain musical landmarks often brought up in conjunction with Athens, Georgia’s Drive-By Truckers: Lynyrd Skynyrd, Neil Young and Crazy Horse, the Muscle Shoals Rhythm Section, R.E.M. But on the road to the Truckers’ excellent new album, English Oceans, songwriter Patterson Hood found himself contemplating a comparison no artist wants to make. “We’d been […]

Monday, August 26th, 2013

Back in print, courtesy of ATO Records: Alabama Ass Whuppin’ – Drive-By Truckers third LP, a live album recorded between March 1999 through August of 2000. This is the sound of DBT as I knew them, live, gigging around the southeast prior to the release of Southern Rock Opera. A furious, driving, twelve track snapshot […]

Monday, April 11th, 2011

(Diversions, a recurring feature on Aquarium Drunkard, catches up with our favorite artists as they wax on subjects other than recording and performing.) One cannot overstate the power of regionalism. Growing up in Georgia, in a rather musical household, I assumed the music of Eddie Hinton was as well known as, say, that of Sam […]

Monday, February 21st, 2011

Nine studio albums and a decade and a half into their career, the Drive-By Truckers have created their own mythology; a mythology that is at once self-contained yet continually feeding off the external world. Some might call it folklore. Explicit at times, but more often than not, subtle, the ever-expanding web the Truckers weave via […]

Wednesday, March 24th, 2010

As the Drive-By Truckers release their eighth album, it’s interesting to see them, lyrically and somewhat musically, creating an album that echoes their earliest records. The Big To-Do is the most distinctly southern album they’ve recorded since Southern Rock Opera. What that means is that where Patterson Hood especially has chased more universal stories and […]

Monday, November 16th, 2009

What is it that makes us want to deconstruct art by units of time? Lists. We love making them. We love arguing over them. And here, on the verge of a new decade, we’re in a position to do the same again. What were the best albums of the past ten years? Here at AD, […]

Thursday, March 5th, 2009

Context is everything. And sometimes it’s the mere shift of geography, the slighter or greater roar of the narrator that can make the biggest difference in a song. Jim Carroll’s “People Who Died” is a legendary song all its own. Originally released on 1980’s Catholic Boy, “People Who Died” runs through a litany of deceased […]